Kees Uit den Boogaard
Professional gardener

Kees points to a nerine enthusiastically: 'Look, the nerine is a refined and delicately shaped flower which, in the right place, adds a unique touch to any garden.'

Kees Uit den Boogaard
Professional gardener

Kees points to a nerine enthusiastically: "Look, the nerine is a refined and delicately shaped flower which, in the right place, adds a unique touch to any garden."

"Its pastel colours, fragile stems and unusual flowers make the nerine, in my opinion, unsuitable for a large border where it is mixed in with strong banks of colour, such as the reds, oranges and yellows of marigolds. The nerine deserves to be more than just a ‘face in the crowd’.”

It should therefore come as no surprise that Kees prefers to plant nerines in Japanese gardens and heather gardens – although he also likes to use nerines in gardens that have no specific theme. “Nerines work well in smaller borders between plants such as rhododendrons (azaleas), which just like nerines are acid-loving plants that thrive in the semi-shade. When in bloom, the nerines’ prettily shaped, pastel-coloured flowers form a gorgeous contrast to the rhododendrons, which are then still green.”

As a professional gardener, Kees is continually striving to combine plants in such a way that there is always something going on in the garden, whatever the season. Since – in contrast to countless other plants – the nerine flowers in the autumn, this ensures that there is a role for nerines in virtually any garden. Kees glances around before pointing to a tree on the other side of the garden. “Take that Prunus Cerasifera Nigra (red cherry plum), for example. Right beneath that tree would be a wonderful spot for nerines – in the semi-shade, just as they like it. Once in bloom, the nerines’ soft pastel pink colours would transition beautifully into the red leaves of the Prunus Cerasifera Nigra. And it’s precisely plays of colour like that which keep a garden looking interesting, even in the autumn!”

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